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country wear

Get The Look – The Countryman

in Get The Look by
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‘Never Brown in Town’ goes the golden sartorial rule, but as we all know, ‘Town’ only refers to London, leaving vast swathes of the country, and indeed other countries, in which to wear the clothing of the country is entirely appropriate. If there is not at least one garment made of tweed in your outfit, then you are not dressed for the country. Tweed, especially Harris Tweed, has protective qualities that will serve you while striding through the bracken, picking blackberries on the greensward or even while navigating the tides of nylon that swarm past us in every town and…

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The Teba Jacket

in Fashion by
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Images of southern Spain, usually composed of matadors, barrels of sherry, women in flamenco dresses and orange trees wilting in the heat, do not commonly include tweed jackets. It’s rarely cold enough in Andalucia to don even a waistcoat, never mind a full tweed ensemble. Yet during the 1930s there emerged, from the royal and aristocratic country set, an Andalucian take on the Hacking Jacket that came to be known as the Teba Jacket. It was named after the snappily titled Don Carlos Mitjans y Fitz-James Stuart, XXI Conde de Teba y XV Conde de Baños, Grande de España, or…

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Sussex Tweed

in Fashion/The Chap Wears by
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You know when you get a new pair of brogues, and then all your other brogues suddenly look tired, old and worn-out next to them? Acquiring a Sussex Tweed cap has the same effect on all your other tweed caps. My collection of bakerboy caps numbers only a modest seven, but when The Windover joined them on the hat stand, they all seemed to cower in humility next to this officer-class piece of headwear. The Windover was presented to me on an occasion that had something of the Japanese Tea Ceremony about it. But the English version, with pints of…

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Cordings of Piccadilly

in Fashion/The Chap Wears by

An association between a 1960s blues guitar legend and an English country clothing store seems unlikely, but it is just this odd, eccentric twist on the traditional that makes Cordings of Piccadilly unique among its Jermyn Street neighbours. Eric Clapton became co-owner of Cordings in 2003, but that milestone was only one of many in the company’s illustrious past. John Charles Cording opened his first shop as an outfitter and waterproofer in 1839 at 231 Strand, manufacturing and selling mackintoshes developed by Charles Mackintosh. Cordings became so well-known for outdoor clothing that when Sir Henry Morton Stanley was preparing for…

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Andreas Mandrysch

in Am I Chap? by
am-i-chap?

“I don’t know whether you would consider any submissions from Germany,” writes Andreas Mandrysch, “but we are earnestly doing our best to keep up with the civilized countries.” Sir, your trouser cuffs fall short of their destination, namely the surface of your shoes. Your chum also displays garter, but he is wearing plus fours so should be. Is he German too? Probably not.

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Louis Newman

in Am I Chap? by
Am-I-Chap?

“I am writing to determine whether I am a chap or not,” writes Louis Newman. “I was told by a friend that I should most definitely send an email to your website. If you need to know what brands they are I can happily tell you.” No thanks.

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